Cannabis & Cancer


Cancer


Title: Pathways mediating the effects of cannabidiol on the reduction of breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.

Key Findings

We show that CBD inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion through differential modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways, and that both pathways lead to down-regulation of Id-1 expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that CBD up-regulates the pro-differentiation factor, Id-2. Using immune competent mice, we then show that treatment with CBD significantly reduces primary tumor mass as well as the size and number of lung metastatic foci in two models of metastasis. Our data demonstrate the efficacy of CBD in pre-clinical models of breast cancer. The results have the potential to lead to the development of novel non-toxic compounds for the treatment of breast cancer metastasis, and the information gained from these experiments broaden our knowledge of both Id-1 and cannabinoid biology as it pertains to cancer progression.”

Information & Links

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20859676

Year: 2012

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-010-1177-4

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Title: Antiemetic effect of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in patients receiving Cancer Chemotherapy

Key Findings

Nausea and vomiting of central origin occur after the administration of a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and frequently constitute the major morbidity associated with such treatment. Control with classic antiemetics is incomplete and variable.

Anecdotal accounts from patients suggested that smoking marihuana before receiving intravenous anti-tumor drugs resulted in diminution of nausea and vomiting, and, in contradistinction to the usual post-therapeutic anorexia, some were able to take food shortly after therapy. Effects of marijuana on nausea and vomiting in human beings deserve to be reported. It has been demonstrated that oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes the same physiologic effects as smoking marijuana (1,2).

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered THC on nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.”

Information & Links

Link: https://www.ukcia.org/research/antiemetic.php

Source: The New England Journal of Medicine

Vol. 293(16) (1975): 795-797.

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Title: Antineoplastic Activity of Cannabinoids

Key Findings

“Lewis lung adenocarcrnoma growth was retarded by the oral administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), Δ8tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ8-THC), and cannabinol (CBN), but not cannabidiol (CBD). Animals treated for 10 consecutive days with Δ9-THC, beginning the day after tumor implantation, demonstrated a dose-dependent action of retarded tumor growth. Mice treated for 20 consecutive days with Δ8-THC and CBN had reduced primary tumor size. CBD showed no inhibitory effect on tumor growth at 14, 21, or 28 days. Δ9-THC, Δ8-THC, and CBN increased the mean survival time (36% at 100 mg/kg, 25% at 200 mg/kg, and 27% at 50 mg/kg, respectively), whereas CBD did not.”

Information & Links

Link: https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-abstract/55/3/597/912322

Year: 1975

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/55.3.597

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Title: Systematic Review Of Systematic Reviews For Medical Cannabinoids: Pain, Nausea And Vomiting, Spasticity, And Harms

Key Findings

“There is reasonable evidence that cannabinoids improve nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. They might improve spasticity (primarily in multiple sclerosis). There is some uncertainty about whether cannabinoids improve pain, but if they do, it is neuropathic pain and the benefit is likely small.”

Information & Links

Link: Systematic Review Of Systematic Reviews For Medical Cannabinoids: Pain, Nausea And Vomiting, Spasticity, And Harms

Year: 2018

Source: PMID: 29449262 PMCID: PMC5964405

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Title: Experts' Perspectives On The Role Of Medical Marijuana In Oncology: A Semistructured Interview Study

Key Findings

“All participants cited nausea as an appropriate indication, and 13 of 15 pain. Over one-third believed MM to have a more attractive risk profile than opioids and benzodiazepines. Participants called for enhanced purity and production standards, and further research on MM's utility.”

Information & Links

Link: Experts' Perspectives On The Role Of Medical Marijuana In Oncology: A Semistructured Interview Study

Year: 2017

DOI: 10.1002/pon.4365

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Title: Preliminary Efficacy And Safety Of An Oromucosal Standardized Cannabis Extract In Chemotherapy-induced Nausea And Vomiting

Key Findings

“Compared with placebo, cannabis-based medicine (CBM) containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, added to standard antiemetic therapy was well tolerated and provided better protection against delayed CINV.”

Information & Links

Link: Preliminary Efficacy And Safety Of An Oromucosal Standardized Cannabis Extract In Chemotherapy-induced Nausea And Vomiting

Year: 2010

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2010.03743.x

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Title: An Efficient New Cannabinoid Antiemetic In Pediatric Oncology

Key Findings

“Complete prevention of vomiting with negligible side effects.”

Information & Links

Link: An Efficient New Cannabinoid Antiemetic In Pediatric Oncology

Year: 1995

DOI: 10.1016/0024-3205(95)00194-B

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Title: Cannabinoids For Control Of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea And Vomiting: Quantitative Systematic Review

Key Findings

“Cannabinoids were more effective anti-emetics than prochlorperazine, metoclopramide, chlorpromazine, thiethylperazine, haloperidol, domperidone, or alizapride.”

Information & Links

Link: Cannabinoids For Control Of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea And Vomiting: Quantitative Systematic Review

Year: 2001

DOI: 10.1136/bmj.323.7303.16

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